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Bowie’s 100 Must-Reads
The Age of American Unreason, Susan Jacoby (2008)The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, Junot Diaz (2007)The Coast of Utopia (trilogy), Tom Stoppard (2007) Teenage: The Creation of Youth 1875-1945, Jon Savage (2007)Fingersmith, Sarah Waters (2002)The Trial of Henry Kissinger, Christopher Hitchens (2001)Mr Wilson’s Cabinet of Wonder, Lawrence Weschler (1997)A People’s Tragedy: The Russian Revolution 1890-1924, Orlando Figes (1997)The Insult, Rupert Thomson (1996)Wonder Boys, Michael Chabon (1995)The Bird Artist, Howard Norman (1994)Kafka Was the Rage: A Greenwich Village Memoir, Anatole Broyard (1993)Beyond the Brillo Box: The Visual Arts in Post-Historical Perspective, Arthur C Danto (1992)Sexual Personae: Art and Decadence from Nefertiti to Emily Dickinson, Camille Paglia (1990)David Bomberg, Richard Cork (1988)Sweet Soul Music: Rhythm and Blues and the Southern Dream of Freedom, Peter Guralnick (1986)The Songlines, Bruce Chatwin (1986)Hawksmoor, Peter Ackroyd (1985)Nowhere to Run: The Story of Soul Music, Gerri Hirshey (1984)Nights at the Circus, Angela Carter (1984)Money, Martin Amis (1984)White Noise, Don DeLillo (1984)Flaubert’s Parrot, Julian Barnes (1984)The Life and Times of Little Richard, Charles White (1984)A People’s History of the United States, Howard Zinn (1980)A Confederacy of Dunces, John Kennedy Toole (1980)Interviews with Francis Bacon, David Sylvester (1980)Darkness at Noon, Arthur Koestler (1980)Earthly Powers, Anthony Burgess (1980)Raw, a “graphix magazine” (1980-91)Viz, magazine (1979 –)The Gnostic Gospels, Elaine Pagels (1979)Metropolitan Life, Fran Lebowitz (1978)In Between the Sheets, Ian McEwan (1978)Writers at Work: The Paris Review Interviews, ed Malcolm Cowley (1977)The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind, Julian Jaynes (1976)Tales of Beatnik Glory, Ed Saunders (1975)Mystery Train, Greil Marcus (1975)Selected Poems, Frank O’Hara (1974)Before the Deluge: A Portrait of Berlin in the 1920s, Otto Friedrich (1972)n Bluebeard’s Castle: Some Notes Towards the Re-definition of Culture, George Steiner (1971) Octobriana and the Russian Underground, Peter Sadecky (1971)The Sound of the City: The Rise of Rock and Roll, Charlie Gillett(1970)The Quest for Christa T, Christa Wolf (1968)Awopbopaloobop Alopbamboom: The Golden Age of Rock, Nik Cohn (1968)The Master and Margarita, Mikhail Bulgakov (1967)Journey into the Whirlwind, Eugenia Ginzburg (1967)Last Exit to Brooklyn, Hubert Selby Jr (1966)In Cold Blood, Truman Capote (1965)City of Night, John Rechy (1965)Herzog, Saul Bellow (1964)Puckoon, Spike Milligan (1963)The American Way of Death, Jessica Mitford (1963)The Sailor Who Fell from Grace With the Sea, Yukio Mishima (1963)The Fire Next Time, James Baldwin (1963)A Clockwork Orange, Anthony Burgess (1962)Inside the Whale and Other Essays, George Orwell (1962)The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, Muriel Spark (1961)Private Eye, magazine (1961)On Having No Head: Zen and the Rediscovery of the Obvious, Douglas Harding (1961)Silence: Lectures and Writing, John Cage (1961)Strange People, Frank Edwards (1961)The Divided Self, RD Laing (1960)All the Emperor’s Horses, David Kidd (1960)Billy Liar, Keith Waterhouse (1959)The Leopard, Giuseppe di Lampedusa (1958)On the Road, Jack Kerouac (1957)The Hidden Persuaders, Vance Packard (1957)Room at the Top, John Braine (1957)A Grave for a Dolphin, Alberto Denti di Pirajno (1956)The Outsider, Colin Wilson (1956)Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov (1955)Nineteen Eighty-Four, George Orwell (1949)The Street, Ann Petry (1946)Black Boy, Richard Wright (1945)

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theantidote:

Bowie’s 100 Must-Reads

The Age of American Unreason, Susan Jacoby (2008)
The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, Junot Diaz (2007)
The Coast of Utopia (trilogy), Tom Stoppard (2007) 
Teenage: The Creation of Youth 1875-1945, Jon Savage (2007)
Fingersmith, Sarah Waters (2002)
The Trial of Henry Kissinger, Christopher Hitchens (2001)
Mr Wilson’s Cabinet of Wonder, Lawrence Weschler (1997)
A People’s Tragedy: The Russian Revolution 1890-1924, Orlando Figes (1997)
The Insult, Rupert Thomson (1996)
Wonder Boys, Michael Chabon (1995)
The Bird Artist, Howard Norman (1994)
Kafka Was the Rage: A Greenwich Village Memoir, Anatole Broyard (1993)
Beyond the Brillo Box: The Visual Arts in Post-Historical Perspective, Arthur C Danto (1992)
Sexual Personae: Art and Decadence from Nefertiti to Emily Dickinson, Camille Paglia (1990)
David Bomberg, Richard Cork (1988)
Sweet Soul Music: Rhythm and Blues and the Southern Dream of Freedom, Peter Guralnick (1986)
The Songlines, Bruce Chatwin (1986)
Hawksmoor, Peter Ackroyd (1985)
Nowhere to Run: The Story of Soul Music, Gerri Hirshey (1984)
Nights at the Circus, Angela Carter (1984)
Money, Martin Amis (1984)
White Noise, Don DeLillo (1984)
Flaubert’s Parrot, Julian Barnes (1984)
The Life and Times of Little Richard, Charles White (1984)
A People’s History of the United States, Howard Zinn (1980)
A Confederacy of Dunces, John Kennedy Toole (1980)
Interviews with Francis Bacon, David Sylvester (1980)
Darkness at Noon, Arthur Koestler (1980)
Earthly Powers, Anthony Burgess (1980)
Raw, a “graphix magazine” (1980-91)
Viz, magazine (1979 –)
The Gnostic Gospels, Elaine Pagels (1979)
Metropolitan Life, Fran Lebowitz (1978)
In Between the Sheets, Ian McEwan (1978)
Writers at Work: The Paris Review Interviews, ed Malcolm Cowley (1977)
The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind, Julian Jaynes (1976)
Tales of Beatnik Glory, Ed Saunders (1975)
Mystery Train, Greil Marcus (1975)
Selected Poems, Frank O’Hara (1974)
Before the Deluge: A Portrait of Berlin in the 1920s, Otto Friedrich (1972)
n Bluebeard’s Castle: Some Notes Towards the Re-definition of Culture, George Steiner (1971) Octobriana and the Russian Underground, Peter Sadecky (1971)
The Sound of the City: The Rise of Rock and Roll, Charlie Gillett(1970)
The Quest for Christa T, Christa Wolf (1968)
Awopbopaloobop Alopbamboom: The Golden Age of Rock, Nik Cohn (1968)
The Master and Margarita, Mikhail Bulgakov (1967)
Journey into the Whirlwind, Eugenia Ginzburg (1967)
Last Exit to Brooklyn, Hubert Selby Jr (1966)
In Cold Blood, Truman Capote (1965)
City of Night, John Rechy (1965)
Herzog, Saul Bellow (1964)
Puckoon, Spike Milligan (1963)
The American Way of Death, Jessica Mitford (1963)
The Sailor Who Fell from Grace With the Sea, Yukio Mishima (1963)
The Fire Next Time, James Baldwin (1963)
A Clockwork Orange, Anthony Burgess (1962)
Inside the Whale and Other Essays, George Orwell (1962)
The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, Muriel Spark (1961)
Private Eye, magazine (1961)
On Having No Head: Zen and the Rediscovery of the Obvious, Douglas Harding (1961)
Silence: Lectures and Writing, John Cage (1961)
Strange People, Frank Edwards (1961)
The Divided Self, RD Laing (1960)
All the Emperor’s Horses, David Kidd (1960)
Billy Liar, Keith Waterhouse (1959)
The Leopard, Giuseppe di Lampedusa (1958)
On the Road, Jack Kerouac (1957)
The Hidden Persuaders, Vance Packard (1957)
Room at the Top, John Braine (1957)
A Grave for a Dolphin, Alberto Denti di Pirajno (1956)
The Outsider, Colin Wilson (1956)
Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov (1955)
Nineteen Eighty-Four, George Orwell (1949)
The Street, Ann Petry (1946)
Black Boy, Richard Wright (1945)

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1,378 notes

sagansense:

Bat-Eating Spiders: The Most Terrifying Thing You’ll See Today

A bat’s enemies: owls, hawks, snakes, the Joker, spiders. Spiders? Yes.

The incidence of spiders eating bats could be more widespread than initially suspected, reports a study published March 13 in PLoS ONE. To reach this conclusion, the authors spoke with scientists, conducted an extensive scientific literature review, dug through the blogosphere, and looked for pictures of spiders eating bats on Flickr.

The search turned up 52 reports of bat-eating spiders, less than half of which had been published before.

The authors report that bat-munching spiders live on every continent except Antarctica. Most catch bats in webs, like the giant golden silk orb-weavers (Nephilidae). As adults, these spiders’ leg spans can be 10-15 centimeters across, and they weave webs more than a meter in diameter. Bats have also been observed in the webs of social spiders, such as Parawixia. But a minority of spiders, like huntsman and tarantulas, forage for prey without a web, and have been spotted munching on bats on forest floors.

Perhaps most surprisingly, “An attempt by a large fishing spider Dolomedes triton to kill a bat pup has been witnessed below a bridge in Indiana,” the authors report.

That spider’s plot was foiled after it became frightened by photographers.

(All photos and captions from Nyffeler M, Knörnschild M (2013) Bat Predation by Spiders. PLoS ONE 8(3): e58120. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0058120)

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

347 notes

ikenbot:

Is ‘Looper’-like Time Travel Possible? Scientists Say Maybe
Time travel is a staple of science fiction, with the latest rendition showing up in the film “Looper.” And it turns out jumps through time are possible, according to the laws of physics, though traveling into the future looks to be much more feasible than traveling into the past.
“Looper” stars Joseph Gordon-Levitt as Joe, an assassin who kills targets sent back in time by the mob. Things get complicated when Joe is assigned to kill his future self, played by Bruce Willis..
In this imagining, time travel has been put to nefarious uses by people operating outside the law. But could such a thing ever happen in real life?
“It’s actually consistent with the laws of physics to change the rate at which clocks run,” said Edward Farhi, director of the Center for Theoretical Physics at MIT. “There’s no question that you can skip into the future.”
However, Farhi told LiveScience, “most physicists think you can go forward, but coming back is much more problematic.”
The roots of time travel stem from Einstein’s theory of relativity, which revealed how the passage of time is relative, depending on how fast you are traveling. The faster you go, the more time seems to slow down, so that a person traveling on a very fast starship, for example, would experience a journey in two weeks that seemed to take 20 years to people left behind on Earth.
In this way, a person who wanted to travel to a period in the future need only board a fast enough vehicle to kill some time.
“That was a huge thing when Einstein realized the flow of time was not a constant thing,” Farhi said.
However, this kind of manipulation only affects the rate at which time moves forward. No matter your speed, time will still progress toward the future, leaving scientists struggling to predict how one might travel to the past.
Full Article

ikenbot:

Is ‘Looper’-like Time Travel Possible? Scientists Say Maybe

Time travel is a staple of science fiction, with the latest rendition showing up in the film “Looper.” And it turns out jumps through time are possible, according to the laws of physics, though traveling into the future looks to be much more feasible than traveling into the past.

“Looper” stars Joseph Gordon-Levitt as Joe, an assassin who kills targets sent back in time by the mob. Things get complicated when Joe is assigned to kill his future self, played by Bruce Willis..

In this imagining, time travel has been put to nefarious uses by people operating outside the law. But could such a thing ever happen in real life?

“It’s actually consistent with the laws of physics to change the rate at which clocks run,” said Edward Farhi, director of the Center for Theoretical Physics at MIT. “There’s no question that you can skip into the future.”

However, Farhi told LiveScience, “most physicists think you can go forward, but coming back is much more problematic.”

The roots of time travel stem from Einstein’s theory of relativity, which revealed how the passage of time is relative, depending on how fast you are traveling. The faster you go, the more time seems to slow down, so that a person traveling on a very fast starship, for example, would experience a journey in two weeks that seemed to take 20 years to people left behind on Earth.

In this way, a person who wanted to travel to a period in the future need only board a fast enough vehicle to kill some time.

“That was a huge thing when Einstein realized the flow of time was not a constant thing,” Farhi said.

However, this kind of manipulation only affects the rate at which time moves forward. No matter your speed, time will still progress toward the future, leaving scientists struggling to predict how one might travel to the past.

Full Article

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2,317 notes

popculturebrain:

‘The Avengers’ Gag Reel (via)

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